A granite retaining wall provides a sun-kissed environment for succulents, including the mighty Agave americana, opuntias, aloes and aeoniums.

A first visit to Morrab

We’re always pleased to receive appreciative comments from people who visit Morrab Gardens. It’s not that praise feeds our vanity (of course not!), but compliments on the quality and condition of Morrab give a great morale boost to our volunteers and the professional gardening team alike.

A leading gardening blogger on a visit to Morrab

Morrab Gardens: Magnolias flowering on the main lawn, viewed across an enormous clump of emergent Gunnera manicata
Magnolias flowering on the main lawn, viewed across an enormous clump of emergent Gunnera manicata
Image and text courtesy of The Frustrated Gardener https://frustratedgardener.com/

So it was particularly pleasing to come across an account of a visit to Morrab Gardens by top garden blogger Dan Cooper, who writes on horticultural topics as The Frustrated Gardener. Dan visited in mid-March, after seeing Instagram posts of our magnolias, and was not disappointed – many of these stars of the early spring were in full flower at the time.

A sun-kissed environment for succulents

Morrab Gardens - a granite retaining wall provides a sun-kissed environment for succulents, including the mighty Agave americana, opuntias, aloes and aeoniums.
A granite retaining wall provides a sun-kissed environment for succulents, including the mighty Agave americana, opuntias, aloes and aeoniums.
Image and text courtesy of The Frustrated Gardener https://frustratedgardener.com/

Another feature that caught The Frustrated Gardener’s attention was the raised bank that runs along the southern side of the Morrab Library. Planted up with Agave americana, opuntias, aloes and aeoniums it provides the ideal setting for a spectacular display of succulents. If Dan had visited twelve months earlier he would have seen many of these plants in a very sorry state, having suffered damage in the late frosts and snow of March 2018. But following extensive replanting with succulents raised by our volunteers this area of the garden is perhaps looking better than ever.

Dan closes the account of his visit to Morrab Gardens with some thoughts on the state of Britain’s Victorian public parks, and praises the work of the Friends of Morrab Gardens in ensuring the Gardens are actively managed and appreciated by visitors.

Read Dan Cooper’s blog post describing his visit to Morrab Gardens

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